October 2012

Pow Wow Hawaii’ 2012 video

[vimeo http://www.vimeo.com/51052641 w=400&h=300]

NFORMATION
Following up on an extremely successful showing in 2011, the multi-day POW WOW Hawai’i art event had its third annual showing in 2012. Originally conceived in Hong Kong, the event moved to Hawaii to help enrich the local creative scene. The event encompasses a global roster of over 50 local and international artists who created art at Loft in Space + Fresh Cafe and over the streets of Kaka’ako over a six-day period between February 13 to 18, 2012.

This first part in a three part series documents POW WOW Hawai’i 2012. Part 2 releases on Friday, Oct. 12th and part 3 comes out on Monday, Oct. 15th.

Directed by: Michael Inouye
Copyright © 2012 · All Rights Reserved · POW WOW Hawaii

Nice work guys!!

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Graffiti Style Jewelry by Vanessa “Agana” Solari Espinoza

Support the Graffiti Style Jewelry Line by Vanessa “Agana” Espinoza, a youth Educator in Graffiti aerosol arts, also known as DJ Agana.



 

Graffiti + Jewelry = AGANA

I aim to provide an abundance of individual style while sustaining jewelry at an affordable cost. Take a look at my CURRENT JEWELRY for a visual example of the new line to come.

The fabulous rewards I have are at a cost that is lower that usual so take advantage of the deals! I really need at least $5,000 to be able to complete the birth of the project and to get it off the ground. I am hoping that the project will be over-funded to meet my actual funding goal. Please feel free to be generous, all the funds will go towards making my jewelry more affordable for you!



Designing like crazy, I have millions of designs just waiting to share with you and the world. With your help, I will be able to expand from focusing solely on precious metals and be able to release a new line with more extensive affordable material options. You will no longer have to wait; I will finally reach a wider audience and the admirers that have requested and desired my jewelry for so long. Thanks to you, a window will open for my followers to be able to afford and claim your very own custom AGANA piece!

http://kck.st/RUJNa6

 

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Epic 80’s

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOtxdeyI024&w=853&h=480]

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btPJPFnesV4&w=640&h=480]

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HPkTGm4RtVM&w=853&h=480]

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10 Top hazards for female writers.

“Compared to chess or a nice bit of tennis on a Saturday afternoon, your favourite hobby has you traipsing through the worst areas of town with angry bums, poor hygiene, and trains to contend with–all without being able to take aim while you pee. So here are some of the things that suck about graffiti, and what you can do about them.


Your pretty pink 90s make the hard rocks of the train lines feel like the lyrics of an R. Kelly song, but an air bubble is no defense against that tiny, orange spire of disease: Pauly D’s penis the rusty nail, which loves to lurk in the kind of no-go zones frequented by writers.

Remedy: To avoid a painful, spasmodic death by tetanus, wear the heaviest shit-kickers you can afford.


With all those abandoned buildings, alleys, and unoccupied city land, graffiti writers share a lot of space with the disenfranchised, and sometimes you might accidentally walk through somebody’s toilet. Once again, tread with caution (literally).

Remedy: More wet wipes, a bottle of water, or if you’re lucky you were going to paint in the drains anyway.


Self-explanatory.

Remedy: Trains are like Taco Bell: don’t underestimate the speed at which they can travel if you don’t want to make a mess of yourself.

NO SHIT getting locked up is bad for your health! Apart from having to use various bodily orifices as safekeeping for your iPod, the idea of sharing a tiny space with 300 other fucked-up women gives me hives. Plus, going to jail is also bad for the health of the people around you. For example, the shame of it may just kill your grandmother.

Remedy: Get your 5.0 Radio App, and the phone number of your area’s Ron Kuby. Don’t paint with suspected snitches. And finally–most importantly–NEVER GET CAUGHT”!!!

Funny bad advise from other female writers Here.
This is taken form C.O.P Magazine Blog enjoy reading more pretty funny stuff!!

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The heart broken Pasty Cline

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-wJNpWgss8&w=640&h=480]


Patsy Cline (September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963), born Virginia Patterson Hensley, was an American country music singer as part of the early 1960s Nashville sound. Cline successfully “crossed over” to pop music. At age 30, she died at the height of her career in the crash of a private plane. She was one of the most influential, successful and acclaimed female vocalists of the 20th century.
Cline was best known for her rich tone, emotionally expressive and bold contralto voice and her role as a country music industry pioneer. She helped pave the way for women as headline performers in the genre. Cline’s was cited as an inspiration by singers in several genres. Books, movies, documentaries, articles and stage plays document her life and career.
Her hits began in 1957 with Donn Hecht’s “Walkin’ After Midnight”, Harlan Howard’s “I Fall to Pieces”, Hank Cochran’s “She’s Got You”, Willie Nelson’s “Crazy” and ended in 1963 with Don Gibson’s “Sweet Dreams”.


Millions of her records have sold since her death. She won awards and accolades, leading some fans to view her as an icon at the level of Johnny Cash and Elvis Presley. Ten years after her death, in 1973, she became the first female solo artist inducted to the Country Music Hall of Fame. In 1999, she was voted number 11 on VH1’s special, The 100 Greatest Women in Rock and Roll, by members and artists of the rock industry. In 2002, country music artists and industry members voted her Number One on CMT’s The 40 Greatest Women of Country Music and ranked 46th in the “100 Greatest Singers of All Time” issue of Rolling Stone magazine. According to her 1973 Country Music Hall of Fame plaque, “Her heritage of timeless recordings is testimony to her artistic capacity.”
(taken from Wikipedia)

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